Kids + Stickers + White Walls = The Obliteration Room

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Jun 27, 2012 | By David Ethier

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What happens when you mix a white room, thousands of stickers, and weeks of museum patrons, including lots of kids? Ladies and gentlemen, Art is what happens – well, at least, The Obliteration Room happens.

Just a cursory understanding of Yayoi Kusama’s history reveals the fact that she has frequently included dots – in some form or another – in her work, and that it comes from visions she had as a child. Apparently her plane of view often included major spaces – or dots – of color, and it’s had a lasting impact on her work. This salient theme is present again with Kusama’s Look Now, See Forever exhibition – in which The Obliteration Room is one of many installments.

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Part of what Kusama’s Obliteration Room so effective is the potential for enjoyment, no matter what our relationship with art is. Often, people cringe at the idea of Modern Art because of a perceived asymmetric relationship between artist (and those who claim to “understand” art) and the casual viewer – one that has us walk out of the exhibition too self-conscious to ask, “what was that all about?” 

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But, The Obliteration Room invites the audience to take part in the creation of the piece – either by projecting their own interpretations onto the work or simply having fun putting stickers on walls and pieces of furniture. It’s a win win. 

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Via This Is Colossal